Pointe Personalities: Meet Joan Parker
Posted By: Becky Davis - 11/1/2019 3:58:54 PM

Nowata might sound like a dusty ghost town in rural America, but it’s actually a thriving oil and gas community near Tulsa, Oklahoma. In the early 1900s, it became known as the world’s largest shallow oil field. Nowata means “welcome” in Delaware Indian, quite the opposite from the legend of a traveler who happened upon a dried-up spring and posted "No Wata" as a warning to others.

It’s the small town where Joan Parker grew up, where her daddy worked in the oil fields before eventually becoming a banker.  It’s also where Joan learned about resilience and courage, both valuable traits that would serve her well throughout her life. 

“I never was afraid of much of anything,” Joan says.  “I think my dad taught me that.  Mom was a worrier but Dad never did worry about much of anything.”

Joan’s dad believed in keeping up with the times, so he bought a new car every other year.  Their home was the first in town to have a dishwasher, but the last to have a dryer.  The weekly wash flapped in the summer breeze on an outdoor clothesline, and dripped dry in the basement during the winter months.

They lived across the road from a nine-hole golf course, so Joan taught herself to play.  “I would go across the road and tee off on number six,” she said.  “I always had golf clubs. They may not have been the right ones, but I had a few and that’s all I needed.”

After high school, Joan earned a degree in history from The University of Oklahoma and started her teaching career.  “At that time, a woman could be a nurse, secretary, or teacher.  So I decided to be a teacher,” she explains.

Following a fast romance she married Dick Parker, a petroleum geologist she met through mutual friends in Midland, Texas.  He was transferred to Amarillo six months after the wedding, but she stayed in Midland to finish the school year before joining him.  They spent 11 years in Amarillo where she taught at Horace Mann, eventually moving to Perryton to raise their three sons.

Joan loved volunteering with organizations like United Way, Senior Citizens, Camp Fire Girls, the hospital auxiliary, Perryton Club, the Beehive Day Care Center, and the Presbyterian church. Teaching adult Sunday school was one of her favorite things, along with baking for various events.  “I was the cookie queen of Perryton,” she says with a grin.  “I gave myself that title.” 

Being a mom to three sons was wonderful – it was just what Joan wanted.  The first two boys – Tim and Hugh – joined their family through adoption.  Then Rob came along, and the family was complete.   

Today, her son Tim is an OB/GYN in Denison, Texas; he and his wife, Melinda, have three children.  Rob is a banker in Amarillo; he and his wife, Mary, have three children.  Hugh passed away in 2016, leaving behind two children and two grandchildren.

Life handed Joan her most significant loss in 2014, when her husband, Dick, passed away.   Faith has always been a big part of her life, and it has given her peace and comfort during the difficult times. 

Now a long-term resident of Bivins Pointe, Joan enthusiastically participates in the faith-related activities offered, including church services on Sundays and Bible chats three times a week.  She also looks forward to playing bingo and farkle, and would love to find some experienced bridge partners.

When her family takes her out for a meal, you can bet on one thing: she’ll order a filet steak, rare.  “I love rare beef,” she says.  “Daddy always said that mom cooked the hell out of meat.  I never liked it that way. I was always good at cooking rump roast, arm roast, really any kind of roast.”

Desserts are also a favorite of Joan’s, especially dark chocolate.  And if key lime pie is on the menu, “I’ll eat mine and someone else’s,” she jokes. 

So if you’re ever in the neighborhood with an extra bag of chocolates, stop by and say hello to Joan.  She’s a great conversationalist, especially on topics she is passionate about like sports, classical music, travel, and history.  And if you’re a bridge player, she really wants to talk to you – but only if you’re an experienced player.  She may be a teacher, but she has to draw the line somewhere. 

By Kelli Bullard

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